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Keynote Lectures

Using ERP Data to Support Operational Planning and Risk Analysis: An Expeditionary Case Study
Brandon McConnell, NC State University, United States

The Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences 2012 and Matching Theory
Tinaz Ekim, Bogaziçi University, Turkey

To be announced soon.
Bertrand Jouve, CNRS, France

 

Using ERP Data to Support Operational Planning and Risk Analysis: An Expeditionary Case Study

Brandon McConnell
NC State University
United States
 

Brief Bio
Brandon McConnell is a research assistant professor in Industrial & Systems Engineering at North Carolina State University and leads the Military Operations Research Group. He is a former U.S. Army Infantry officer and has held various key leadership positions both in combat and garrison. His interests include expeditionary logistics planning, risk analysis, and stochastic models. His work emphasizes using OR models and analysis to identify tradeoffs, illuminate decision-spaces, and support the operational user in near-real time. He earned his PhD and masters degree in Operations Research from NC State and his B.S. in OR from the United States Military Academy at West Point.


Abstract
The U.S. Army’s adoption of an enterprise resource planning (ERP) system known as the Global Combat Support System – Army (GCSS-A) creates a new opportunity to link operational data to modeling and analytical efforts. Recent advances in queuing theory have opened new opportunities for analytic modeling of complex systems. This permits modeling both time-varying (nonstationary) and non-Markovian (nonexponential) properties across complicated systems and networks. This presentation offers a data-driven approach to forecast logistical requisitions for an expeditionary military operation using GCSS-Army data. Model inputs include task organization, mission set, and operational timeline. The result is a sample-path based approach that can feed multiple modeling techniques; examples will include logistics capacity planning and risk analysis application all in an expeditionary environment. We discuss the benefits and challenges associated with integrating some of these modern advancements with previous deterministic approaches to obtain near-real time stochastic performance predictions while staying faithful to detailed problem nuances. The case study presents a solution that required integrating recent advances in transient queue analysis with a deterministic logistics model. These challenges are presented in the context of logistical planning and risk analysis for a notional contingency scenario.



 

 

The Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences 2012 and Matching Theory

Tinaz Ekim
Bogaziçi University
Turkey
 

Brief Bio
Tinaz Ekim is an associate professor in the Department of Industrial Engineering at Bogaziçi University, Turkey. She completed her Ms degree at the Université Paris Dauphine in the Computer Science and Mathematics Department. She obtained her PhD in 2006 in Operations Research from Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), supervised by Dominique de Werra. Her research focuses on Structural and Algorithmic Graph Theory, Combinatorial Optimization and Complexity Theory. She was the director of three bilateral research grants with France and Slovenia, and director of two other national research grants. She is also the recipient of the Young Scientist Award 2016 given by the Turkish Academy of Sciences. She was a Fulbright Visiting Scholar during the academic year 2017-2018 at the University of Oregon. More information available at http://www.ie.boun.edu.tr/~tinaz


Abstract
The Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences 2012 was awarded jointly to A. E. Roth and L. S. Shapley "for the theory of stable allocations and the practice of market design."  The reason why it was awarded to A. E. Roth and L. S. Shapley is two-fold: their extremely valuable efforts in applying scientific findings in very important real life problems such as kidney exchange and student placement problems, and their contribution to the theory of stable matchings.

In this talk, we will present the theory of stable matchings starting from the basics such as the Gale-Shapley Algorithm, discussing more advanced topics such as manipulation and existence of stable matchings under various conditions. Two important applications, namely kidney exchange and student placement problems will be given special consideration. In the second part of the talk, the role of graph theory in stable matchings will be discussed in more depth. In particular, the links between stable matchings and the problem of finding an inclusion-wise maximal matching of minimum size will be explored. As a natural consequence of this link, the need for studying various graph classes will be emphasized.



 

 

To be announced soon.

Bertrand Jouve
CNRS
France
 

Brief Bio
Available soon.


Abstract
Available soon.



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